Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II State of Civil Rights Address in Which He Outlines Next Steps in the Moral Monday Movement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

14 October 2013

Two days ago, on Saturday morning, to the largest civil rights gathering in Eastern North Carolina in decades, Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II presented his annual "State of Civil Rights in North Carolina" report to the North Carolina NAACP. He heaped praise on the tens of thousands of North Carolinians who participated in the 13 Moral Mondays at the Peoples House on Jones Street in Raleigh to expose the tea party's extreme legislative policies.  He thanked the local peoples assemblies that brought the Forward Together Movement into every corner of the state, at simultaneous assemblies in the 13 U.S. Congressional Districts at the same hour, 50 years ago, that Dr. Martin Luther King urged the 1963 participants to take the March on Washington back home in the South, to accelerate the long, hard work of dismantling racism back home.  And he listed the dozen Moral Mondays that have been held around the state, and several that are planned in the near future--as well as Moral Monday groups becoming activated around the nation.  

Dr. Barber did not just report to the huge crowd of NAACP leaders, representatives from the 150 partners in the Historic Thousands on Jones Street, and other state leaders attending the NC NAACP's 70th State Convention.  As is his practice, he laid out a vision for the work of the organization and the Moral Monday/Forward Together Movement it leads over the next period. As you can see in this video, the huge crowd was with him, as he spelled out the next steps in the Forward Together Movement that has swept the state, and caught the imagination of political leaders across the country.  

Below are the 7 points that he outlined:

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NC NAACP Pleased the United States Is Asking U.S. Courts to Block the Recently-Passed Voter Law of North Carolina Legislators and Governor

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

30 September 2013

DURHAM: US Attorney General Eric Holder will announce today that the U.S. Attorneys from the three North Carolina Federal Districts in North Carolina will file a lawsuit on Monday, September 30, asking the Federal Courts to stop the law the majority of the NC General Assembly passed and Governor McCrory recently signed--a law many voting rights experts call the 'Worst Voter Suppression law in the nation.


The 'Voter Suppression' law was thrown together by tea party elements in the General Assembly to try to make it more difficult to vote for the growing electorate that wants to move North Carolina forward, not backward. After the Supreme Court cut the heart out of the Voting Rights Act last summer, ultra-right legislators celebrated. They called the VRA a "headache," and quickly threw their favorite suppression tactics into a catch-all bill, to reduce the new southern electorate of minorities, students, the elderly, the disabled, the poor, and working people. They cut early voting by seven days, cut same-day registration, stopped counting provisional ballots cast when a voter mistakenly came to the wrong polling place, and stopped the "long lines" rule that allowed for the extension of voting hours. McCrory and the right-wingers who control the House and Senate, led by Thom Tillis and Phil Berger, were proudest of the new law forcing everyone to obtain a government-issued ID by the 2016 election, eliminating all other forms of ID including student ID's.

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Scholars Highlight Statewide Impact of Moral Mondays (Herald Sun)

Five professors from Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill sat on a panel Thursday evening at UNC’s FedEx Global Education Center to discuss Moral Mondays as North Carolina’s new social movement. The talk was organized by Scholars for North Carolina’s Future.

The Moral Monday movement, which is spreading across the state, takes a stand against N.C. General Assembly decision-making and legislation that has impacted Medicaid and reproductive rights to voting rights and education.

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Youth-led Moral Monday Honors Young Birmingham Martyrs (The Triangle Tribune)

RALEIGH – The N.C. NAACP and its Youth and College Division held the 18th installment of Moral Monday in downtown Raleigh.

The gathering on Monday honored Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Denise McNair - four little girls who were killed 50 years ago in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Ala.

The Forward Together Movement is calling on change in regards to recent education and voting rights legislation in North Carolina. Students, citizens and activists gathered at First Baptist Church on South Wilmington Street and marched towards the Governor's Mansion.

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Youth-Led Moral Monday

9/16/13

Photo Credit: Kaitlyn Barlow

MM_youth5.jpg 

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